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clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie says "she has my vote." williams says i think she has been a great job for secretary of state but will not vote for her for president. andy says hillary 2016. military spouses against the
and clinton and everyone else thereafter, when they did that, now i understand they are just not the party that any of us would want to be involved with. that's all i have to say. host: the video we just showed was shot by a c-span producer with his iphone. it was the former senator in a wheelchair making his way into the chamber yesterday for that vote. here's the new york times with that story. and a screen grab. seven he sat in support of the tree. -- he sat in support of the treaty. he's 89 and is a republican at who was the majority leader. his wife elizabeth dole and he left the port and republicans voted down the street. he was recently released from walter reed military center. now an independent caller from ohio, lee. caller: good morning. i am calling about something i have not heard about. people willing to take the $15 or $20 extra they're getting from the to% tax break, it is coming off their pension when they retire. social security is based on what you contribute. host: you are talking about the payroll tax cut, extending that possibly as part of the fiscal cliff negotiation
"the hill" newspaper. dixie is a republican in clinton, mississippi. what do you think? caller: good morning and thank you for taking my call. i think it is a surprise to me, and i cannot help but wonder why all the talk about increasing taxes, making cuts, and we need cuts, why the welfare is never addressed. we have people who are living like millionaires from welfare. they get free food, they get free housing, they get free schooling, they get -- the children get lunches two times a day at school. and they get all kind of benefits, but nothing is ever said about cutting any of that. that medical bills are paid. people criticize medicare, but people on medicaid get much better care than the people who are on medicare. i paid over $3,000 for my hearing aid, that came out of my pocket. if i had been on medicaid, that would have been absolutely free. but nobody ever talks about cutting any of that. i think every social program should have a sunset date. and besides, when they talk about cutting, that's never a cut, it's just a decrease in the amount of increase. i really think there's
for democrats, you are on caller: when clinton was on office we did good going through the household finance stuff. when bush came in he didn't have no programs. i had a $150,000 business going good with 10 employees. and i got sick with cancer. i had to sell everything. i didn't have no way to save my home or nothing. i don't understand why they do this. you try to work hard with the banks, you get a lawyer and the lawyer wants to rip you off. i don't understand. >> i guess i'm not exactly sure what the question is. there are lots of problems when people are in foreclosure and there are all sorts of problems they have. it's always good to try to work it out with the lender. the problem is that when push comes to shove the house is collateral and the thing we're talking about now which is a tax issue is what happens after you lose the house and do you have to pay more taxes. host: we have a graphic from the "wall street journal." the big short is the hoin. headline. >> you can see from the chart here the volumes of short sales for the previous 12 months period for each month and they just gr
. going back to the clinton tax rates, remember, the average american family has taken a hit. median income four years ago was $54,000 a year. it is about $50,000 a year now. this portion of the population has been squeezed. adding taxes on 90% will not be helpful. how much do you want folks to bear? freezing those tax rates for the overwhelming majority of americans is a smart thing to do. host: you said fight later on. guest: the fight would start the next day. we could do what i'm talking about, and negotiations could continue. doing what i'm talking about does not violate what either side is fighting over. they both say this is something we want to do. why not make sure we do not have some last-minute failure at the end of december. guest: what gives you confidence that democrats would agree later on? guest: this is where i disagree with some of my colleagues. they seem to think the american people are leveraged, and this is the democrats leverage. our leverage is in the spending and entitlement issues. the president and his negotiators are smart and able people. they know the re
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5